A simple yet charming slice of a grieving film-Entertainment News, Firstpost

Mugizh is refreshingly minimalism. The mere fact that a marketable hero like Vijay Sethupathi accepts a premise like this sounds like a miracle

Language: Tamil

In the past few weeks, Vijay Sethupathi has had three movie releases. He also hosts a show on a popular Tamil TV channel, has given numerous interviews. Suddenly, Vijay Sethupathi is everywhere: in theaters, on digital platforms, on TV, on Youtube. Memes flooded the internet and they became trolls, fueled by the failure of his recent plans. But VJS shows no signs of slowing down: it has a long list of projects that are in various stages of production. So the popular opinion became: “Do we see too much Vijay Sethupathi”

In a recent interview with Movie companion, while talking about old-time veterans like Kamal Haasan and Sivaji, VJS pointed out that only people who are criticized are those who are constantly experimenting. “People who do the same thing and leave, they’re not so scrutinized,” he said. This constant urge to experiment, he says, comes from the concern that creative personalities have for audiences: “Every time they come, they must have something new. When you introduce them to a strain, we make a difference in the tastes of our audiences. This comes from not underestimating the intelligence of the public.

This quote might as well apply to Vijay Sethupathi, whose filmography is so remarkable and unique among his peers. From the antagonist to “character roles”, his filmography has a bit of everything. And as a result, they’ve always been a mixed bag. For each, Super De Luxe Where 96, we have a Rekka or a Sangatamizhan. Whether or not his efforts were successful, his zeal to experiment never reached a plateau.

Mugizh, a 62-minute theatrical release, is Sethupathi’s latest experimental getaway. Starring his daughter and Regina Cassandra apart from himself, Mugizh is a simple story about how a child deals with grief. The chemistry between the family is palpable, thanks to the naturally efficient performances of the main trio.

The film is refreshingly minimalism: there are no lofty issues, no corporate and institutional injustices to rectify.

This is the story of Kavya (Sreeja Vijay Sethupathi) who is afraid of dogs. Animal lover Radhika (Regina) and Vijay get a dog to help Kavya overcome her fear. The new addition, Scooby, makes a charming addition to the loving family. He becomes everyone’s favorite, as even the fear-ridden Kavya warms up to the cute puppy. Until the day the family loses him.

Mugizh unfolds like a snack of snapshots from our families. The cinematic language is consciously understated, with generous doses of pleasant music (Mugizh has music by Revaa) in the background. Faced with the absence of their pet, the family passes on grief. Kavya refuses to leave her bed, consumed with guilt. Radhika struggles to cope with both the loss of her pet and her child’s indifference to her. A few insightful moments between the family, permeate the feeling of life. Whether it’s Kavya apologizing to Radhika for leaving her alone in her grief, or Radhika openly expressing her need for support, the little frills make it up. Mugizh a healthy watch.

However, the theater doesn’t feel like the right home for a movie. Mugizh. With a running time of just 62 minutes, the experience ends quickly, especially when theaters insist on having a 20-minute interval. The movie would be over before you even finished your meal. A digital release would have been a better way to experience this movie.

Amid all the gangster drama, action thriller, and bloody action we see our best stars constantly indulging in, the mere fact that a marketable hero would accept a premise like this feels like a miracle. . This is why VJS, whatever its successes or failures, is an actor that I will always support and will continue to do.

Evaluation: * * *

Ashameera Aiyappan is a film journalist who writes about Indian cinema with a focus on South Indian films

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