Arts and Lectures will feature seven events this fall

A performance by the award-winning performance group Black Took Collective highlights the fall lineup of the long-running Arts & Readings series at Cal State San Marcos.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the series will be presented in a virtual format for the third consecutive semester. All events will take place via Zoom.

This season features a diverse selection of seven events as the university hosts renowned speakers and performances.

Participants can book their tickets online through the Arts & Conferences website from August 30.

Staying Safe When Relationships Go Digital

Oct 5, 6 p.m., Zoom webinar

The shift to virtual education and online living has created a host of challenges for students, not least of which is navigating online abuse and prioritizing their digital security in relationships. As we acclimatize to an increasingly digital existence, it’s critical to understand how dating violence, stalking, identity theft and harassment have also gone digital. In this presentation, Adam dodge will explore practical and accessible ways to prioritize digital security in our lives while preventing harassment online and through our devices.

CSUSM students: Free

Community: Optional donation

Faculty / staff / alumni: Optional donation

Global movements for social justice

Oct 14, noon, Zoom webinar

This virtual panel will discuss the parallels between local, regional and global voices and movements for social justice. This empowerment event will emphasize recognition and dignity, but also recognize prejudice, marginalization, violence and other limits to identification, association and mobility. Dr. Antonio De La Garza (pictured far left) will share unique perspectives on the intersection of migration and gender in the US-Mexico border regions. Henri Edouard Frank (pictured left) will share views of North American Indians from northern California. Dr. Meshack Simati discuss electoral rules, elections, electoral violence and judicial independence in sub-Saharan Africa. Dr. Darren bylerS’s expertise on the ongoing struggles of the Uyghur people in western China will enlighten the public on how this group of indigenous Chinese continue to seek dignity in the face of authoritarian rule.

CSUSM students: Free

Community: Optional donation

Faculty / staff / alumni: Optional donation

Tell them where you’re from: Teach our lives / stories

Oct 19, 6 p.m., Zoom webinar

In this dynamic presentation using poetry and testimony, Dr. Irene Sanchez will share his experiences as a high school Latinx teacher. She will discuss how teaching history is not enough – to teach for social justice, teachers must relate the past to the present and to students’ lived experiences, so that the next generation will see that it can make a difference. change for the better today. Sanchez is a professor of ethnic studies in the Unified School District of Azusa and a professor of teaching ethnic studies for UC Riverside Extension. As a writer, his commentary has been featured on CNN, Huffington Post, and Public Radio International.

CSUSM students: Free

Community: Optional donation

Faculty / staff / alumni: Optional donation

Chola Vida: Homegirls Navigating from Barrio to Academia

October 25, 6 p.m., Zoom webinar

The literature on gang formation in the United States focuses on the experiences of men, leaving women’s narratives on the sidelines. Today, women participate in gangs and teenage subcultures much like their male counterparts. An organization that supports former and active female gang members, Chola Vida inspires stay-at-home girls to go to college and spread knowledge by creating barrio frameworks that promote awareness and symposia to reach large audiences. Panelists will discuss pressing topics focused on Chola solidarity, education / scholarships, economic development / entrepreneurship and social justice work.

CSUSM students: Free

Community: Optional donation

Faculty / staff / alumni: Optional donation

Rhythmic Ancestries: Screening of the film with the choreographer / DJ / Curator jose e. a bad

November 1, 2 p.m., Zoom webinar

jose esteban abad is a multidisciplinary choreographer, DJ and curator based in San Francisco. Born in Olongapo City, Philippines to a Filipino mother and an Afro-Caribbean sailor in the US Navy, their work explores the complexities of cultural identity at the crossroads of gender, sexuality, class and of the race. Rooted in collaboration and improvisation as tools of resistance and liberation, abad’s work centers on the experimental practices of collective becoming and remembering based on the collective processes of QTBIPOC. They shine a light on the smartest technologies that exist in this world – our bodies, ancient wisdom and nature. abad will present three short films followed by a conversation.

CSUSM students: Free

Community: Optional donation

Faculty / staff / alumni: Optional donation

Deported

November 17, 5:30 p.m., Zoom webinar

The film “DeportedLooks at immigration issues from a different perspective: What happens to US residents born overseas after their deportation? Filmmakers Rachelle magloire and Chantal Regnault follow the members of a unique group of outcasts in Haiti: the criminal deportees from North America. Most have not been on Haitian soil since they left when they were very young children. Through a series of individual portraits, “Deportees” gives voice to former delinquents and their families. Viewers need to think about the multifaceted impact of repatriation and whether it creates more problems than it solves. The jury will include Magloire, the director of the film, and Guerline Jozef, a leading immigration expert who testified before Congress.

CSUSM students: Free

Community: Optional donation

Faculty / staff / alumni: Optional donation

Black took the collective

December 9, 6 p.m., Zoom webinar

the Black took the collective is a performance group made up of three award-winning black LGBTQ poet-performers: Duriel Harris, Dawn Lundy Martin (pictured far left) and Ronaldo V. Wilson (pictured left). The collective challenges both popular conceptions of racial identity and conventional artistic practices. This event will feature live writing, poetry, music, dance, drawing, film and critical race theory presented in an engaging and vivid format designed to encourage reconsideration of identity. , language and embodiment, and spark audience participation and conversation.

CSUSM students: Free

Community: Optional donation

Faculty / staff / alumni: Optional donation

‘,’ window.fbAsyncInit = function () {‘,’ FB.init ({‘,’ appId: ‘216372371876365 ‘, ‘,’ xfbml: true, ‘,’ version: ‘v2.6 ‘ ‘ , ‘});’ ]; ppLoadLater.placeholderFBSDK.push (‘_ ga.trackFacebook ();’); ppLoadLater.placeholderFBSDK.push (‘};’); var ppFacebookSDK = [
‘(function(d, s, id) {‘,
‘var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; ‘,’ if (d.getElementById (id)) return; ‘,’ js = d.createElement (s); js.id = id; ‘,’ js.src = “https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js”; ‘,’ fjs.parentNode.insertBefore (js, fjs); ‘,’} ( document, ‘script ‘, ‘facebook-jssdk ‘)); ‘ ]; ppLoadLater.placeholderFBSDK = ppLoadLater.placeholderFBSDK.concat (ppFacebookSDK); ppLoadLater.placeholderFBSDK.push (‘‘); ppLoadLater.placeholderFBSDK = ppLoadLater.placeholderFBSDK.join (” n”);

Source link

About Monty S. Maynard

Check Also

Candyman and the questionable calculation of horror with racism

Foree, who was actually in the same civil rights activist and theater group in Harlem …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *