Germany goes wild for French films at the Berlinale

Every year in February, the German capital hosts one of the biggest international film festivals, the Berlinale. The festival turns since 1951, the dawn of the Cold War, as a “showcase of the free world” and its evolution through Berlin’s divided history made it a uniquely qualified platform for uncovering social issues through the prism of film. Considered, according to his website, for being “the most political of all major film festivals”, the Berlinale is a great place for moviegoers in this highly international city to get a taste of the most raw, cutting-edge and progressive films from around the world. moment, from all over the world. But this year, many of these films pass through France. Nine of the twenty films in competition for the Golden Bear for best film are French productions or co-productions. And that’s not counting the many other sections of the festival.

While the competition winner receives the Golden Bear for Best Picture, a variety of “Silver Bears” are awarded for accolades such as Best Director, Best Screenplay, or Grand Jury Prize.

In addition to the titles in competition, the titles of the festival other headings include the Berlinale Special & Berlinale Series (for the “extraordinary and glamorous”), Encounters (for the “aesthetically and structurally daring”), Panorama (for the “sexy, edgy and daring”) and Generation (for young filmmakers). Around 400 films are screened each year, ranging from feature films to documentaries and more experimental works. This year, the festival will take place from February 10 to 20. The program has just been unveiled this week and tickets will be available for purchase three days before each performance. So if you’re in town looking to see some of these hot new productions, you’d do well to keep an eye out for ticket releases to secure yours.

Here are some of the most exciting French films coming to the Berlinale this month.

Both sides of the blade (With love and relentlessness)

Category: Competition

Directed by Claire Denis and starring Juliette Binoche, Vincent Lindon, Grégoire Colin, Issa Perica and Bulle Ogier, Both sides of the blade follows the unfolding of three lives. When a woman (Binoche) meets an old flame (Colin), the two spark their bond. Things get complicated when the woman’s husband (Lindon) resumes a professional relationship with his wife’s love interest, an old friend from her past. Dennisknown for directing films such as Good work (1999), is a fan favorite, and his new film is eagerly awaited by true connoisseurs of French cinema.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Line

Category: Competition

Line, directed by Swiss-French director Ursula Meier and co-written by Meier and lead actress Stéphanie Blanchoud, follows the aftermath of a family dispute between a 35-year-old woman (Blanchoud) and her mother. After being served with an injunction, Blanchoud’s character makes a daily pilgrimage to the titular line that separates her from her family, 200 yards from her mother’s front door. The film also stars Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Elli Spagnolo, Dali Benssalah and India Hair, and is a Swiss, French and Belgian co-production.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Passengers of the night (Passengers of the night)

Category: Competition

This “nostalgic saga of self-invention” combines the social and political optimism of 1980s France with one woman’s very personal quest to better the world in any way possible. passengers of the night stars Charlotte Gainsbourg alongside Quito Rayon-Richter, Noée Abita, Megan Northam and Thibault Vinçon, in this touching film by director Mikhaël Hers.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Kant’s Stone

Category: Competition

Kant’s stone, loosely based on Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s 1972 film “Die bitteren Tränen der Petra von Kant” (“The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant”), will open the Berlinale on February 10 at the Berlinale Palast. This is the sixth time that director François Ozon has competed at the festival, and will star Denis Ménochet in the lead role, alongside Isabelle Adjani, Khalil Gharbia, Hanna Schygulla and Stéfan Crépon. A satirical comedy part commentary and part meta-commentary on the themes of the original film as well as its creation, Kant’s Stone follows the rocky relationship of a successful director and the mentorship of a much younger man.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Let’s go children

Category: Recruits

Listen, there’s a reason the high school dance movie genre has lasted so long. It never fails to entertain. Let’s go children takes the trope at an elite high school in Paris, where students from different backgrounds learn hip-hop dancing as they struggle to pass the baccalaureate. Newcomers Thierry Demaizière and Alban Teurlai.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Europe

Category: Forums

Philip Scheffner, best known as a documentary filmmaker, ventured into the world of fiction with the highly visual and enigmatic Europe. An Algerian woman (played by Rhim Ibrir) obtains a medical residence permit in a small town in southwestern France, but is turned away after recovering and forced to return home.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Unbelievable but true (Unbelievable but true)

Category: Berlinale Special Gala

Directed by the eccentric Quentin Dupieux, Incredible but true is a wacky, light-hearted comedy about a couple who discover an unusual secret in the basement of their quiet suburban home. Lasting just 74 minutes, the film makes full use of its stars, Alain Chabat, Léa Drucker, Benoît Magimel, Anaïs Demoustier and Stéphane Pezerat, despite the short timeline.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Nobody’s Hero (Come, I’ll take you)

Category: Overview

You might not expect a movie that begins with a terrorist attack to be particularly funny, but nobody’s hero is not afraid to find humor in saying it. Directed by Alain Guiraudie, this satirical but serious film features an ordinary man (Jean-Charles Clichet), the sex worker he falls in love with (Noémie Lvovsky), the young Arab he takes in (Iliès Kadri) and a crowd of other characters trying to understand what solidarity between neighbors means in a time of paranoia and prejudice.

Tickets can be purchased here.

About Joan (About Joan)

Category: Berlinale Special Gala

It’s not an international film festival without a bit of Isabelle Huppert. About Joan stars the French icon in a dreamlike tale about a woman’s journey from Ireland to France, through love and loss, motherhood and career, in this production from director Laurent Larivière.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Coma

Category: Dating

Not quite fact, not quite fiction, Coma is a pandemic commentary on the dangers and pleasures of life online. Director Bertrand Bonello takes his 18-year-old daughter (played by Louise Labeque) as the subject, in this dark, funny and fantastical journey through video conversations and daydreams. Julia Faure plays a mysterious influencer named Patricia Coma, while actors like the late Gaspard Ulliel interpret the voice in this feature film mixing live action and animation.

Tickets can be purchased here.

About Monty S. Maynard

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